4 Interview Questions You Should Never Ask (and What to Ask Instead) | ForceBrands Newsroom

4 Interview Questions You Should Never Ask (and What to Ask Instead)

An interview is an opportunity to showcase who you are, why you’re the best fit for the role, and what makes you stand out from other candidates. While there are some rules of etiquette — like dress code and behavior — that are universal to the interview process, determining the best questions to ask is often trickier to navigate as no two interviews are the same.

Questions should be tailored to the employer and role. They should be thoughtful and well researched. And as important as it is to know what to ask, it’s equally important to know what not to ask during the process.

According to a 2014 survey conducted by CareerBuilder, 32 percent of hiring managers reported that not asking good questions in an interview is one of the most common mistakes job seekers make during the hiring process. Here are the questions you should avoid asking during an interview and the questions you should consider asking instead.

1. “How soon can I expect to be promoted?”
While this question shows your ambition to succeed, it may also prove that you’re not willing to put in the grunt work of the role in which you are applying to get there.
Pro tip: Try asking, “What does upward mobility look like for this role?” 

2. “What are some of the perks and benefits of this role?”
This question can often be misinterpreted and lead the hiring manager feeling like he or she needs to sell you on the role. Wait until you have a firm offer on the table before inquiring about the company’s perks.
Pro tip: Try asking, “Would you mind describing the culture of the firm for me?”

3. “Will this role lead to opportunities to work in other departments within the company?”
This question might express your interest in the company, but it may also hint at your lack of focus on the role you are applying to. Stay focused and present during your interview.
Pro tip: Try asking, “Are there any internal mentorship or professional development programs that would connect me with leaders within the company?”

4. “When was the company founded?”
Avoid asking obvious questions. It’s important to do your research about the employer but avoid questions that yield no real meaningful dialogue.
Pro tip: Try asking, “What do you find to be the most rewarding aspect of working here?”

Ready to put these tips to practice? Search our job boards and apply for great beverage, food, beauty, and cannabis roles today.